Safe Medication Use

Remember the 3 R’s of safe medication use: All prescriptions and nonprescription medication have risks. Respect the power of your medication and the vale of medicines properly used. Take responsibility for learning about how to take your medication safely.

Medication questions to ask

Questions to ask your doctor before taking any prescription medication, herbal or other over-the-counter, r supplemental medications: Why do I need this medication? What is the name of the medication? How does it work? What are the potential side effects? Which ones should I can my doctor about? Will the medication interact with the other prescription and nonprescription drugs I am taking? How long will I need to be on the medication? How many tines a day …

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Common Painkillers Increase Risk For Heart Attack & Stroke

Healthy adults who reach for common painkillers to ease the twinges of everyday aches and pains could be setting themselves up for a heart attack or stroke, according to recent research. Past studies clearly showed that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including Advil, Motrin and Aleve, to relieve pain was linked to an increased risk of heart attack or stroke in those who already had heart disease. But now a study from Denmark …

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Safe Medication Practices

Usually if we get sick, the medicine we take helps us stay healthy when we follow the dosage instructions. But sometimes medication errors do happen and people can get hurt as a result. Medication errors can happen in hospitals, in pharmacies or even at home. The good news is that the more information you have, the better able you are to prevent errors and take care of yourself Taking Your Medication: When taking medicine, keep …

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Adult Immunizations

THE CDC ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON IMMUNIZAtion Practices routine immunization recommendations for adults are below. Tetanus, Diphtheria & Pertussis Vaccine (Td/ Tdap): protects against three bacterial diseases. Tetanus bacteria poisons can cause lockjaw and muscle spasms. Respiratory diphtheria initially causes a sore throat, fever and chills. Pertussis (whooping cough) causes severe coughing spasms that can last for weeks. Adults should have completed a three-dose primary series of tetanus- and diphtheria-containing vaccine as a child, and subsequently should …

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When You’re Taking Medications

MEDICATIONS ARE SOMETIMES NECESSARY: No one likes to take medications. They may be difficult to swallow. They may be inconvenient. They may be unaffordable. They may cause side effects…some minor, some major. In rare instances, they may cause serious adverse effects. The reality is, however, that there are times in our lives when medication is not merely beneficial, but essentially life saving.  At these times, if we want to live, we must take them. SHARING …

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What You Need to Know About the Flu Vaccine

Why get vaccinated? Influenza (flu) is a contagious disease. It is caused by the influenza virus, which can be spread by coughing, sneezing, or through nasal secretions. Anyone can get influenza, but rates of infection are highest among children. For most people, common symptoms last only a few days. These common symptoms include: fever, sore throat, chills, fatigue, cough, headache, and muscle aches. Other illnesses can have the same symptoms and are often mistaken for influenza. …

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Antibiotics Are Not Always the Answer

No one wants to be sick. When people feel sick, they want to get better fast. Many people complain that they went to their doctor when they were feeling really sick and the doctor didn’t give them an antibiotic… and they were disappointed. But antibiotics aren’t the answer for every illness. What’s the harm in taking too many antibiotics? Using antibiotics (also known as antibacterials) when they are not necessary can result in some bacteria …

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Medication Safety in Ambulatory Settings: This One’s for You!

Barbara Olson, Nurse, Other Clinical, 09:43AM Sep 19, 2010 Last week the New England Journal of Medicine published an interesting commentary about safety in ambulatory care settings (Patient Safety beyond the Hospital), comparing issues and outcomes with those in acute care facilities. The authors note that the safety infrastructure is less developed in physician practices and clinics than it is in acute care facilities. This reminds me of events reported to and shared by ISMP, …

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Off-Label Use of Drugs

by: Irene Levine | from: AARP Bulletin | April 2008 As Ida Kalde’s Alzheimer’s disease progressed, she became increasingly confused, combative and delusional. She accused her son and daughter-in-law, Pete and Evelyn Ruut, whose Kingston, N.Y., home she lived in, of hiding the baby she thought she had given birth to. ” We were nearly at the end of our rope, ” Evelyn Ruut says. To help quiet Kalde, her doctor prescribed the antipsychotic medication Risperdal. ” …

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